Ship-breaking Issues and Challenges’ ScienceDirect Procedia Engineering 194

Ship-breaking is the process of destroying an obsolete vessel for
disposal.1 This
activity was not officially recognized as an industry in Bangladesh until 2006,
even though the country is one of the biggest ship-breakers in the world. This
industry has dramatically expanded in Bangladesh, at the cost of environmental
indignation and huge labour exploitation.2 Ship owners
and ship breakers earn large profit by avoiding decontamination, dumping
environmental costs to workers, local farmers and fishermen. The toxics sicken
the workers and ravage coastal ecosystems. In Bangladesh, there are 25% children
found in the workforce and the total death toll runs into the thousands.3

 

Most of the ship-breaking industry in Bangladesh is situated in Sitakund
of Chittagong on the Bay of Bengal. In this chapter focus will be on the
condition of these workers inside and outside the yards. This chapter will
discuss about the present situation or condition the workers are facing
everyday in the ship yards.

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Condition of Labour in Yard:

 

There are different types of groups doing different works in the ship
yard.In 2009, May 31st, 50 workers died because of the exploitation of the
Iranian tanker called TT Dena.4  Lacking of safety for the workers working in
the yard undoubtedly exists beyond limit.

1 Supra note 12 at pg. 46.

 

2 Ibid at page. 14.

3 Environmental Justice Alart, ‘Dirty and dangerous shipbreaking in Chittagong, Bangladesh’ https://ejatlas.org/conflict/dirty-and-dangerous-shipbreaking-in-chittagong, retrieved on 2 December  2017.

 

4  Rabbi, Ruhan.Hasna. , Rahman,Avelina.
‘Ship Breaking and Recycling Industry of Bangladesh; Issues and Challenges’ ScienceDirect Procedia Engineering
194 ( 2017 ),  at pg 257 https://ac.els-cdn.com/S1877705817332939/1-s2.0-S1877705817332939-main.pdf?_tid=3b75586e-e1d6-11e7-bdff-00000aab0f6c&acdnat=1513369778_d04a87feeb185cd0c9810dcecb1d3715 retrieved on 2 December 2017